It started with a cough and the need to clear her throat whenever she ate. Eventually, swallowing became more difficult — and even dangerous — for Patricia Grimm, 63, of the North Side. “I’d be at Red Lobster eating a salad or in the car eating a hamburger and I’d start choking,” she says. ”When you can’t…

Additional Info

  • Issue Quarter Spring
  • Issue Year 2018
  • Sub Heading Eating and drinking doesn’t come easily for millions, but a wide range of therapies can help
As a liver specialist for more than 25 years, Dr. Michael Babich has seen a seismic shift in his practice. No longer are viruses or chronic alcoholism destroying the livers of most of his patients at Allegheny Health Network. Now, it’s the overconsumption of fructose — an industrialized form of sugar that has crept into…

Additional Info

  • Issue Quarter Winter
  • Issue Year 2018
  • Sub Heading A spoonful may help the medicine go down, but America’s addiction to it is a recipe for disease
  • Sidebar Title How much added sugar is ok to eat?
  • Sidebar Content Block The most you should eat in a day, according to the American Heart Association, is 150 calories (37.5 grams or 9 teaspoons) for men and 100 calories (25 grams or 6 teaspoons) for women. A typical 8-​ounce soda has 8 teaspoons of added sugar.
By the time Nancy Schollaert Nichol arrived to see her family doctor after experiencing abdominal pain for five days, the visit didn’t last long. She was immediately sent to the UPMC Northwest emergency department in Cranberry where she found out she’d need emergency gallbladder surgery.

Additional Info

  • Issue Quarter Fall
  • Issue Year 2017
  • Sub Heading Combating a little-​known syndrome that is both common and deadly
Michaela Cook of Beaver Falls didn’t hesitate to give her husband one of her kidneys in 2010. The couple had two young children when Erik Cook’s organs were damaged beyond repair by type 1 diabetes. Like most living organ donors, Michaela was motivated by the desire to help a very sick loved one.

Additional Info

  • Issue Quarter Summer
  • Issue Year 2017
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