HEALTH /​SCIENCE

Making a Splash

by Kelly Casey
More than a century ago, scientists figured out how to deploy sound waves to locate the position and distance of enemy submarines. This discovery would also lay the groundwork for using high-​frequency sound waves to peer inside the human body and usher in the age of ultrasound.

Herbert Simon: 20th Century Galileo

James H. Morris is a retired professor of computer science and dean of the School of Computer Science as well as the Silicon Valley campus of Carnegie Mellon University. In a series of blogs for Pittsburgh Quarterly he writes about some of the computing pioneers he encountered during his career.

Raj Reddy: Modern Circumnavigator

James H. Morris is a retired professor of computer science and dean of the School of Computer Science as well as the Silicon Valley campus of Carnegie Mellon University. In a series of blogs for Pittsburgh Quarterly he writes about some of the computing pioneers he encountered during his career.

Allen Newell: The Lone Ranger

James H. Morris is a retired professor of computer science and dean of the School of Computer Science as well as the Silicon Valley campus of Carnegie Mellon University. In a series of blogs for Pittsburgh Quarterly he writes about some of the computing pioneers he encountered during his career.

Take as Prescribed, with Care

by Darian Carrow
Medications prescribed to treat illness do unintended harm to an alarming number of patients in the United States each year.

Robert Taylor: Demanding Coach

James H. Morris is a retired professor of computer science and dean of the West Coast campus of Carnegie Mellon University. In a series of blogs for Pittsburgh Quarterly he writes about some of the computing pioneers he encountered during his career.

Alan Perlis: The First Computer Scientist

I was a teenager in 1957 when the Russians launched Sputnik. In the national reaction to it I was inspired to pursue science. I was all set to go to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology or the California Institute of Technology to become a physicist, when the Carnegie Institute of…

Why We Don’t Take Our Meds: The Conclusion

by Greg Curtis
“If you torture data long enough, it will confess anything.” –Nobel Laureate Ronald Coase

Work Disrupted

The past and future of work collide on a 178-​acre graded-​flat stretch of brownfield in the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Hazelwood.

What’s Right, What’s Left?

by Samuel Hazo
So much of modern culture seems bent on eliminating humanity from life itself. In many instances, this is identified as progress. But is it?

How Many Heart Beats Do You Want?

by Greg Curtis
So there I was, at the end of April 2015, off all my prescription meds. (I still took a baby aspirin and a multivitamin, don’t ask me why.) I was feeling great and knew I needed to exercise, but knowing and doing are two very different things.

The Powder of Death

by Nick Keppler
Marley Fisher walked away from several overdoses during her six years of opioid addiction. The batch that finally killed her left her unable to even stumble out of the Point State Park bathroom stall into which she ducked to shoot up.

On a Pedestal: Magee-​Womens Research Institute

by PQ Staff
Many Pittsburghers have a somewhat vague idea that the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC successfully attract federal dollars to support their varied research activities. But the extent of that success in recent years is almost shocking when you look at the numbers and the rankings.

Up in Smoke

by Julia Fraser
Dan Ward is 27 and lives in Pittsburgh’s Garfield neighborhood. He is mostly vegan, rides his bike to work and walks in the park as often as he can. He also vaped for several years, using an electronic cigarette to satisfy a need to “have one vice to balance my…

A New Way to Fight Overdose

by Nick Keppler
When Dave Lozier campaigned to be the district attorney of Beaver County, one topic dominated conversation at every meet-​and-​greet and campaign stop.
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