Pittsburgh Quarterly Contributors
Barry Paris

Barry Paris

Barry is an award-​winning biographer, film historian, Russian translator and contributor to The New Yorker and Vanity Fair. Among his books are Audrey Hepburn and Song of Haiti, the story of Dr. Larry and Gwen Mellon and their Albert Schweitzer Hospital.

Song of Kittanning

The tranquil beauty of the Allegheny River at its idyllic venue in Kittanning conceals restless ghosts and a violent history. Safe to say, the 18th-​century Native Americans who lived there never imagined it couldn’t be defended from a few hundred white invaders, or that the fate of two great Old World empires across…

Song of Squirrel Hill

“Jews are just like everybody else, only more so,” Wyoming Benjamin Paris* liked to say. He was an authority on the subject of chutzpah, and the star of his Hill District basketball team — a team with no uniforms or name.

Song of Weirton

We talk about living in the Tri-​State Area, figuratively. The “we” in Weirton live in it literally. My waitress at Mario’s Italian Restaurant on Main Street is a fine example: She’s wearing a black-​and-​gold, No. 7 Roethlisberger jersey as she serves up the boss’s home-​and-​handmade spaghetti, while a poster behind her proudly announces…

Song of Lawrenceville

As a child growing up in Pittsburgh in the ‘50s, I thought that Lawrenceville was named for our mayor and that the soldier statue at Butler and 34th Street was David L. Lawrence as a young man.

Song of Canonsburg

The bustling borough of Canonsburg, 20 miles due south of Pittsburgh, was incorporated Feb. 22, 1802, on what Mother always called George Birthington’s Washday. Yes, it was a bit disrespectful. But so was Mother. And so, for that matter, was George.

Song of Greensburg

A thousand feet up the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in the beautiful Laurel Highlands lies the city of Greensburg, an hour southeast of downtown Pittsburgh. A major business and cultural center, its 16,000 population doubles during work hours, giving it one of highest daytime-​growth rates in the country.

Song of Sewickley

Would you be shocked to learn that Sewickley — the patriotic, upper-​crust town just downriver of Pittsburgh — holds an annual American flag-​burning in broad daylight on public property?

Song of Washington, Pa.

The mother of all Washingtons occupies the federal District of Columbia, yet smaller ones abound. The Father of His Country sired no children but, by way of surrogate progeny, he begat towns bearing his surname in no fewer than 27 states.

Song of Slippery Rock

This “Song” even has lyrics — of a sort — in the form of Jack M. MacDonald’s How Slippery Rock Got Its Name, written for the town’s 1975 sesquicentennial:

Song of Mount Washington

The first Native Americans to spot the first white men approaching their halcyon Green Triangle did so from the same basic observation deck — give or take a few hundred yards — where native ’Burghers admire their Golden Triangle today. By moonlight, those Indian sentries had a perfect view of all telltale torches and flickering campfires at…
  • Douglas Heuck is the founding editor and publisher of Pittsburgh Quarterly.
    Please don’t hesitate to contact him about any aspect of the magazine.
    Douglas Heuch

    Douglas Heuck

    Founding Editor & Publisher

  • Anita DuFalla joined Pittsburgh Quarterly as creative director in 2017. She art-​directs photography and illustrations, and designs each page.
    Anita DuFalla

    Anita DuFalla

    Creative Director & Graphic Designer

  • Sue Glaneman has over 20 years of experience in the publishing industry. Contact her for print and online advertising and marketing programs, as well as corporate event partnerships.
    Sue Rye Glaneman

    Sue Glaneman

    Dir. of Advertising & Corporate Events

  • Cori is Pittsburgh Quarterly’s assistant graphic designer, previously a PQ intern, a freelance designer for various non-​profits and a designer for a management software company.
    Corin Schipani

    Corin Schipani

    Assistant Designer & Web Manager

Douglas Heuck, Jennifer McNulty, Sue Rye Glaneman, Margaret Krauss
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