Profiles

Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

George C. Marshall: True soldier

On Sept. 1, 1939, as German troops thundered across the Polish border, Gen. George C. Marshall succeeded Malin Craig as the U.S. Army Chief of Staff. One week later, Marshall returned to his birthplace and childhood home in Uniontown, 46 miles southeast of Pittsburgh for a homecoming celebration.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Abraham J. Twerski

I was born in Milwaukee where my father was a rabbi. Two of my brothers were six and eight years older than I and were off to yeshiva when I was about 7.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Thomas Hales: The Proof of the Proof

The message went out without fanfare on a quiet summer morning. Thomas Hales finally was done — or so it seemed.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Mark DeSantis wants to be mayor

I don’t want to be mayor of Pittsburgh. I want to change Pittsburgh forever, and I’m convinced the best way to do that is as mayor. There are, however, other ways to make our city better. You could work for an extraordinary politician who cares for this city like no…
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Rich Engler

I was born in New Kensington, Pa., and grew up in Creighton, across the river. My father was a glass worker at the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company. My mother worked for the county. I studied art education at Youngstown State, then at Carnegie Mellon.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Andrew Mellon: Son of a judge

The year was 1866. With monotonous regularity, an older man and a little boy boarded the train in East Liberty for the short run downtown. The older man, attired in a long-​tailed frock coat and a high-​starched wing collar, spoke to the boy about matters of consequence; he spoke to…
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

The gift of opportunity

In October, one of Pittsburgh’s children is coming home and throwing a big party. That child is the Carnegie Corp. of New York and the “party” is a two-​day celebration of the most recent winners of the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

A book thing

Ten or 15 years ago, a story about Pittsburgh’s “independent” bookstores wouldn’t have made much sense. “When we opened in 1990, there was just the Borders in South Hills,” says Richard Goldman, co-​owner of Mystery Lovers’ Bookshop.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Jeanne Pearlman

I was raised in Squirrel Hill. It was a close-​knit community that valued ideas and intellectual activities. For my parents, dinnertime was not only about eating.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Andrew Carnegie: Black, white

Andrew Carnegie was America’s first great industrialist, the nation’s quintessential philanthropist, and, closer to home, Pittsburgh’s favorite son. He was also, however, a man of startling ethical and moral contrasts, and those paradoxes threaten his reputation.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

To the rescue

On the first morning of November, I walked down the long slope from my house in Squirrel Hill to the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland for a meeting of foundation leaders to do what people in my position do so many times each week: Assess the merits of a…
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Nathan Davis

Kansas City, Kansas, and Kansas City, Missouri, are twin cities, with nightclubs and great musicians in both places. The only thing that separates the two cities is a bridge.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Joseph A. Hardy III

Money. That’s your scorecard. Absolutely. But anyone who is financially successful is so because of the contributions of many people. I don’t say that because I’m a good guy. I say that because it’s true.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Astro Teller

I’m an entrepreneur, the CEO of a company. That takes up a lot of my time. But I love playing with my kids, doing things with friends and getting exercise. I’ve also found that I need artistic stimulation to exercise the other part of my brain.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

His way

On the afternoon of Sept. 21, 1980, a rookie outfielder for the Chicago Cubs cracked his first major league home run over the centerfield wall at Wrigley Field. Four days later, he hit his second homer, and two days after that, a third.
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