Profiles

Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Arnold Palmer

I was born in 1929 and raised during the Great Depression in Latrobe, Pa. Life was pretty tough in those days, but thankfully, my mother, father, little sister and I were together a whole lot of the time. We played golf, skied and went to movies — things like that — but we were…
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Smilin’ Charlie Schwab

The Christmas season was in full flush Dec. 12 1900 at the University Club in New York, where the city’s financial and industrial elite gathered to honor Charles Michael Schwab, the president of Carnegie Steel.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Eleanor Ott: A friend in need

Eleanor Ott grew up in a family that encouraged her to pursue her passion in life. What that passion was didn’t become clear until after she left her Lawrence, Kan. home as a high school valedictorian with a college scholarship.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

David M. Matter

If there’s one thread that runs through my life, it’s the importance of mentorship. I was born in 1946, which makes me a baby-​boomer — barely — and grew up in Carrick. Overall, I had a pretty normal upbringing.
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Joseph P. Kennedy

Harvard played its final game of the 1911 baseball season the day after graduation. With Harvard up 41 and one out to go, team captain and star pitcher Charles B. “Chick” McLaughlin called time, for a substitution at first base.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Cyril H. Wecht

My mother and father were immigrants who had a mom-​and-​pop grocery store, and they worked hard. I was an only child — born March 20, 1931 — and, from the beginning, my father told me that I was going to be a doctor.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Chip Ganassi

Growing up in the 1960s and ’70s, Pittsburgh was the center of the universe. All the biggest companies were here: U.S. Steel, Gulf Oil, Alcoa, PPG, Westinghouse; you name it. And on top of that, we had the Pirates and the Steelers. The city was firing on all cylinders, and…
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Baby Byron turns 18

In the 1990s, the “Baby Byron” case exposed the nation to Allegheny County’s child welfare system — and one family’s ultimately unsuccessful battle to complete a cross-​racial adoption. “Baby Byron” turned 18 in July. And his story is far from over.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Thaddeus Mosley

Art is about personal expression. Anyone who discovers and practices this has something to live for other than what they have to do to make a living. People who write poetry don’t make a lot of money, but seeing their words on the page provides more satisfaction than any job…
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Dick Thornburgh

I’ve had three distinct phases of my career — from public prosecutor to elected official to Washington lawyer — and, strangely, they all came about serendipitously. I grew up in Pittsburgh and went to Yale as an engineering student, even though I was not really suited for it.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Jeanne Pearlman

I was raised in Squirrel Hill. It was a close-​knit community that valued ideas and intellectual activities. For my parents, dinnertime was not only about eating. It was also about talking, thinking and challenging. Any opinion expressed had to be countered with another opinion. My father would always ask, “Why…
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Barbara Luderowski

I arrived in Pittsburgh about the same time that Columbus arrived in America. Actually, it was in 1972, or thereabouts. I was driving through, hustling my work, and stopped at Pittsburgh History & Landmarks to try to interest them in a garden I wanted to design for them.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

Robert Qualters

What’s it like to be 75? Well, I’ll tell you. I’ve had two knee replacements. I’ve had back surgery. I keep falling down and breaking things: my fingers, my skull.
Pittsburgh Quarterly Exclusive

David L. Lawrence

The year was 1955, the place the long bar at the Carlton House Hotel. Standing as bookends were Pirates sportscaster, Bob “the Gunner” Prince and KDKA newscaster, curly-​haired Bill Burns. Both men were serious drinkers, but the Gunner, resplendent in a canary yellow blazer with an ever-​present screwdriver in hand…

George Westinghouse: The Mystery

It was a dreary fall day when, on a friend’s suggestion, I visited the George Westinghouse Museum in Wilmerding. It is housed inside the former Westinghouse Air Brake offices, a gray stone building with a hint of the medieval, appropriately named “the Castle.”
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