Contemplating the Death of Mice

by Dave Macpherson
I sit in my living room on a quiet winter morning dimmed by an opaque, gray sky. I hear crunching, first thinking a squirrel is playing on my roof, or winter snow and ice is starting to slide. The intermittent sound is persistent and peculiar. I walk toward it. It…

A Life Caring for Fallingwater

by Douglas Heuck
Lynda S. Waggoner is vice president of the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy and director of Fallingwater. On the occasion of her retirement, we asked her to look back on more than 50 years at Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece.

Man’s Best Friend

by Douglas Heuck
There once was a dog named Stormy. When he was very young, a man became his friend and carefully introduced him to all sorts of people, places and situations. He kept little Stormy away from frightening things, and Stormy grew up to love people and the world.

An Open Letter to Amazon

by Douglas Heuck
With cities across the nation primping and preening to be the fairest of them all and win the prize of becoming Amazon’s second headquarters, I’d like to let the Amazon decision makers know about a quality which I doubt has been part of any sales pitch thus far.

Market Square Frankie Sings His Song of Life

by Kate Benz, photography by John Altdorfer
The stroller is one of those sporty, three-​wheeled versions, the kind that athletic moms like to push around suburban neighborhoods while huffing out a cardio burn. This one is parked in a crosswalk, about two feet from the curb, right on the corner of Market and Fifth in the shadow…

Saying Goodbye

by John Beale
As a child, my mother often reminded me that we all enter and leave this world the same way. It’s what we do between those two events that will define our lives.

New Long Stairway in Mill District, 1940

by Jennifer McNulty
Perched atop a network of stairs, photographer Jack Delano captured this snow-​dusted Hazelwood scene in 1940 for the Farm Security Administration (FSA).

Helen Hanna Casey, Real Estate Maven

by Jeff Sewald
I grew up in Shadyside, the daughter of Howard W. Hanna Jr., and Anne Freyvogel Hanna, with an older brother and younger sister. Eventually, all three of us went to small Catholic colleges.

Blankenship, Rossi, Rizzo, Peddada, Finkel, Davitt, Reis

by PQ Staff
Chip Blankenship is CEO of Arconic, the former Alcoa division that makes aluminum and titanium parts for the aerospace and automotive industries. A metallurgist by training, Blankenship began his career with General Electric in 1992 after earning a B.S. in materials engineering from Virginia Tech and a Ph.D. in materials…

Flo’s Wisdom — on the Eve of 50 Years as a Waitress at Pamela’s

by Kate Benz, photography by John Altdorfer
Around 1 p.m., right after the lunch rush, 87-​year old Flo Silbach will start slowing down. She won’t quit, though. Oh no, no way she’s quitting. Her shift at Pamela’s Diner in Millvale doesn’t end until four. So, instead of shuffling around the tables and booths, jotting down orders in…

Remembering Prominent Pittsburghers Who Passed Away in 2017

by PQ Staff
From Henry Hillman to Dr. Thomas Starzl, we’ve said goodbye to many influential Pittsburghers this year. Remember those who have passed away and their impact on the region — and the world — in this compilation of our Last Chapter department.

Burger, Beaumont, Fincke, Lowry, Frankel, Papadakos, Dozzi, Troan

by PQ Staff
Herb Burger, 87: A leading Pittsburgh advertising executive, Burger led the PR effort that created the 1980s slogan, “Pittsburgh: The city with a smile on its face” while president of Creamer Inc. After the firm was sold, Burger started the St. George Group. He was the first chairman of the…

The Trouble with the Elites

by Greg Curtis
C. P. Snow titled his last book, written shortly before he died, “A Coat of Varnish.” What he meant, as he put it, was that “Civilization is hideously fragile.” Civilization, that is to say, is like a thin coat of varnish spread on top of human savagery. The varnish looks…

Europe Fails to Build the New Man

by Greg Curtis
Since human beings settled into communities — that is, since most of us stopped being hunter-​gatherers — a primary goal of mankind has been to improve how we are governed. We wanted governments that were more representative, fair, and efficient, governments that could improve our economic circumstances and defend themselves (and us) from outside…

Standing Tall

by PQ Staff
This fall’s NFL national anthem controversy was an opera whose bloated cast of characters would be hard to match — from President Donald Trump, to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, to team owners across the country to rich NFL players professing social concern. And as many problems as the world seems to have,…
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