PEOPLE & OPINION

Reunion-​ited (And it Feels OK)

by Elizabeth Wiethorn
I recently attended my 30-​year high school reunion, or as I affectionately call it — Operation “Glory Days.” Quite the surreal experience, and one I approached with a mixture of excitement and anxiety.

Loose Change, Part V

by Greg Curtis
Last week we examined one of the “changes” Americans are looking for, and we focused on Russia. This week let’s look at a remarkably similar situation, namely: Israel As with Russia, when Barack Obama left office America’s relations with Israel had hit rock bottom, as bad as they had been…

Loose Change, Part IV

by Greg Curtis
Last week we solved the problem of reforming a defective Affordable Care Act in a simple and brilliant manner. Alas, not all the changes Americans want — and voted for — will be so simple to effect. For example, let’s turn to:

Loose Change, Part III

by Greg Curtis
In my last post I breathlessly announced that I held the solution to the American healthcare dilemma in my hot little hands. While the hapless Republicans and Democrats are stumbling around blaming each other and wishing the healthcare issue would just blow away, your humble blogger has solved the problem…

Loose Change, Part II

by Greg Curtis
In my last post we observed how overwhelming the desire for “change” is in America, and we also paused to notice the penalty the Democratic Party has paid for ignoring voters’ wishes. In this post and the ones that follow, I will touch on some of the more important policies…

Loose Change

by Greg Curtis
Since the Presidential election there has been a lot of loose talk about “change.” In this series of posts we’ll try to tighten up that conversation by identifying some specific changes Americans have on their minds. Specifically, I’ll touch on some of the more controversial changes the new Administration will…

Blending Image and Word

Ekphrasis first began as a rhetorical form used by the ancient Greeks. Defined by Webster’s as “a literary description of or commentary on a visual work of art,” it remains one of the oldest forms of artistic analysis, dating back to Homer’s description of Achilles’ blacksmith god-​created shield in The…

Hath Not a Jew

by Sarina Gruver Moore
Of Shakespeare’s major comedies, The Merchant of Venice is my least favorite because it’s the least funny. In a post-​Holocaust world it’s difficult to stage the play’s anti-​semitic jokes, and directors often make the understandable choice to shift the tone contour of the play toward the political and tragic.

The World Through a Food Truck

“Just don’t tell Baba our chicken is better.” It’s the only request Ryah asks customers who stop by to visit Leena’s, the food truck she operates out of a ’91 Chevy Step Van that began its life delivering the Pittsburgh Post-​Gazette.

Seeing a Garden in a Pile of Debris

by Kate Benz, photography by John Altdorfer
Julia had fired up the chainsaw because she had been bored, really. Retirement had been fun for an hour or two, but she needed something to do.

Car Trouble

by Elizabeth Wiethorn
At 5:30 a.m. one recent morning, I was driving the Parkway East to Monroeville, and actually ON TIME. I began to hear a loud “ka-​thunk” from the front left of my mini-​van. Suddenly, my front left wheel popped clean off. Had it been later, I would have been horrified at…

Mario’s Corner of the World in Sewickley

by Kate Benz, photography by John Altdorfer
Mario spends most of his life in the dungeon. That’s what he likes to call his Sewickley Shoe Repair shop, the dungeon, although his beaming face betrays him.

Meet Jack Roseman, the Tech Whisperer

by Evan Pattak
Shortly after Keith LeJeune helped found Agentase, a company that developed tools to detect hazardous chemicals, he called on Jack Roseman. LeJeune was so impressed with Roseman that he hired him as a consultant.

On the (Inevitable) Donald, Part V

by Greg Curtis
We’ve talked about school desegregation and we’ve talked about the fight against discrimination, two highly desirable movements that were, unfortunately, built on the backs of working families, leaving the elites who sponsored them untouched. Unsurprisingly, many of those working families now support Donald Trump and, whether he wins or loses,…

On the (Inevitable) Donald, Part IV

by Greg Curtis
Let’s talk about discrimination. I had a friend, now deceased, we’ll call Millie. Millie grew up in a wealthy and influential family and graduated from law school in the 1930s — a real gender pioneer. But getting a law degree and getting a law job were two different things. Whenever Millie would…
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